Polymer

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Any polymerization needs monomers (atoms or molecules) bound together by sharing pairs of electrons (covalent bonds).

………………………………..Monomers make up everything, living and non-living, naturally occurring and man-made.
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All covalently bonded macromolecules are not polymers.

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The intermolecular forces(secondary bonds) binding polymer molecules together are weak(less than 5 kilocalories per mole), in comparison to the strong primary (20 to 80 kcal/mole) intermolecular bonds within metals or ceramics or to the intramolecular carbon-carbon backbone bonds holding the polymer molecule together.

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The intermolecular forces(secondary bonds) binding polymer molecules together include London dispersion forces, hydrogen bonds, and an assortment of dipolar and induced-dipolar intermolecular van der Waals forces that govern the interactions between two noncovalently bound atoms or molecules.
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A single atom of hydrogen is a monomer.

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Even though a single molecule of water is made up of multiple atoms – one hydrogen and two oxygen, it’s still a monomer.

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Proper manipulation of monomers gives birth to different polymers with a virtually limitless range of functions.

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‘Life’ might be a byproduct of nature’s polymer-making.

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Polymers have infiltrated almost every aspect of modern life.

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“Most polymers we use in everyday life are from petroleum-based products, and although they’re durable in use, they’re also durable in waste.”

-Marc Hillmyer

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Many biodegradable carriers bags are made from polylactic acid, a polymer derived from plant starch.

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Biodegradable polymers still make up less than 10% of the total plastics market. says Hillmyer.

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Biodegradable polymers cost too much. Too much oxygen atoms stiffen biodegradable polymers.

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Polymer membranes function as molecular sieves for separating gases, de­salinating seawater and keeping molecules apart inside fuel cells.

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Polymers can store data, with each monomer representing a single bit of information.

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Glucose is a common natural monomer that bonds with other molecules to make starch and glycogen.

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The two monomers joining together can be the same kind, or they can be different.

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The number of molecules a monomer is able to bond with is determined by the number of active sites on the molecule where covalent bonds can be formed.

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Monomers—repeating molecular units—are connected into polymers by covalent bonds.

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The word monomer comes from Greek mono- (one) and -mer (unit).

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Sometimes polymers are made from bound groups of monomer subunits.Such a subunit (of a few dozen monomers) is called oligomer.

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A polymer changes its properties if one or a few oligomers are added or removed.

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Collagen and liquid paraffin are oligomers.

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Monomers do not necessarily form polymers unless the conditions are right.

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